Kanlaon Volcano now on Alert Level 1

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PHIVOLCS raised the alert level in Kanlaon Volcano from 0 (normal) to 1 (abnormal) due to increased seismic activity, Wednesday.

PHIVOLCS said the volcano’s seismic monitoring network recorded 80 volcanic quakes on Tuesday. Of the Kanlaon’s 80 earthquakes, 77 were “low-frequency events that are associated with magmatic fluids beneath the edifice,” it said.

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The increased seismic activity “could be succeeded by steam-driven or phreatic eruptions at the summit crater, despite the absence of visible degassing or steaming from the active vent this year,” it added.

“The local government units and the public strongly reminded that entry into the 4-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) must be strictly prohibited due to the further possibilities of sudden and hazardous steam-driven or phreatic eruptions,” Philvocs said.

“Civil aviation authorities must also advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejects from any sudden phreatic eruption can be hazardous to aircraft,” it added.

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Also read: Mayon volcano ‘crater glow’ could be precursor to eruptive activity, alert level 2 remains

Kanlaon Volcano now on Alert Level 1

Kanlaon is an active stratovolcano on the island of Negros, Philippines. It is the highest point in Negros, as well as the whole Visayas, with an elevation of 2,465 m (8,087 ft) above sea level.

The volcano straddles the provinces of Negros Occidental and Negros Oriental, approximately 30 km (19 mi) southeast of Bacolod, the capital and most populous city of Negros Occidental and the whole island. It is one of the active volcanoes in the Philippines and part of the Pacific Ring of Fire.

On March 29, 2016, Kanlaon erupted for 12 minutes, which produced a volcanic plume 1,500 m (4,900 ft) above the crater, and a “booming sound” was heard in some barangays near the volcano. According to the police department of Canlaon City, several fireballs, which were coming from the crater of the volcano, started to flow following a booming sound and to cause a bush fire. PHIVOLCS issued alert level number 1. No casualties were reported.

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