Ayala Corp. orders 450K doses of AstraZeneca vaccine; half to be donated to gov’t

Ayala Corp. ordered 450,000 doses of -19 vaccine worth P120 million, half of which would be donated to the government.

Fernando Zobel de Ayala, Ayala Corp. chief operating officer said the would assist the government in the vaccines’ procurement and distribution nationwide.

“In the private sector, we’ve decided to order 450,000 vaccines of AstraZeneca so the total donation that we will be giving to government will be about 120 million pesos. Government, in turn, as you know Sec. Harry, has requested that 50% be given for individuals that the government selects, and 50% will be given back to the private sector so that we can also provide the vaccine for the people who need it,” said Zobel.

“We’re also helping with the distribution which is going to be a very important component in making sure that the vaccines can get to the public. This is a critical component,” he added.

According to Zobel, each vaccine costs $5.50, with $0.50 allocated for the logistics.

“We’ve never faced anything like this at least in our recent history as a company. This is a time for everyone — public sector, private sector — to work together. Never have we faced a crisis of this proportion that has produced so much suffering in our country,” Zobel de Ayala said.

Also read: Philippine population to reach 110.8 million in 2021 – PopCom

Ayala Corp. orders 450K doses of AstraZeneca vaccine

In December 2020, AstraZeneca approved the private sector’s request for the second batch of vaccine supplies for donations.

Presidential on entrepreneurship and Go Negosyo founder Joey Concepcion said AstraZeneca allowed the second batch of vaccine procurement.

AstraZeneca said earlier its COVID-19 vaccine was 70% effective in crucial trials and could be up to 90% effective.

The drugmaker also said that it would manufacture as many as 200 million doses by the end of 2020. The number was 400 times higher than U.S. competitor Inc. AstraZeneca said 700 million doses could be available worldwide by the end of the first quarter of 2021.

“This means we have a vaccine for the world,” said Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford University group that developed the vaccine.