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Killing of Abu Sayyaf leader hailed as major setback to terror group



Another Abu Sayyaf leader has been killed, the military has revealed today (Saturday, April 29).

Alhabsy Misaya has been blamed for the kidnapping of dozens and Indonesian, Vietnamese and Malaysian hostages, including one who was beheaded.

Army Chief of Staff General Eduardo Año told The Associated Press that that the terrorist was slain in a clash with marines late last night in jungle territory between the towns of Indanan and Parang in Sulu province.

“We consider him the most notorious kidnapper from that bandit group and this is a big setback to the Abu Sayyaf,” he said.

The death of Alhabsy Misaya will be a big blow to Abu Sayyaf

Misaya had been blamed for the abductions of dozens of cargo ship crewmen of cargo ships and tugboats plying the Sulu Sea between the southern Philippines and Malaysia.

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He was believed to be holding several abducted Vietnamese sailors in his jungle stonghold but the hostages were apparently not with him during the clash.

A kidnapped Malaysian man was beheaded by Misaya’s group in November 2015.

The killing is just the latest military success against the Islamic State-affiliated group, which recently launched a foiled kidnapping raid on the tourist island of Bohol.

MORE ON ABU SAYYAF AND TERRORISM IN THE PHILIPPINES:

Three more Abu Sayyaf terrorists, including one leader, killed on Bohol
Nine dead after Islamic-State linked terrorists storm tourist island

Battle-hardened Islamic State fighters plan to regroup in southern Philippines

Factsheet: The Abu Sayyaf terror group – who they are and what they do

“Now he kills me”: Last words of German beheaded by Abu Sayyaf

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Duterte says Abu Sayyaf ‘not criminals’, and blames US for terrorism

Islamic State plotting new terror stronghold in Mindanao

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